Topic: Monticello House & Gardens

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Enjoying Monticello’s West Lawn

Artist G.B. McIntosh imagines some of the activities that took place on Monticello's West Lawn during the spring of 1820. Seen in this picture from left to right...
Lesson Plan

Exploring Monticello: A Guide for Young People

Students will explore Monticello through A Guide for Young People.  Students will build their knowledge based on an anticipation guide, information within the guide, and guided discussions with...
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Exploring Monticello: A Guide for Young People

An illustrated brochure developed for younger visitors to Monticello.  Includes fun and interesting facts about Jefferson and his plantation, and introduces members of Jefferson's family and the enslaved community through their daily activities and work.

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FAQ Monticello Architecture

Monticello is a good example of Roman neoclassical architecture. Neo means new and neoclassical means that it is a new, or revivial, style of classical Roman architecture.

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Great Clock in Monticello’s Hall

The Great Clock, which features and interior and exterior face, is one of the prominent features of Monticello's Hall
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Hall showing the seven-day clock calendar

The top canonball weight for Jefferson's Great Clock marks Tuesday, midmorning.
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Hall with recreated Native American artifacts

Modern recreations of artifacts sent to Jefferson by MeriwetherLewis hang Monticello's Hall
Lesson Plan

I cannot live without books.

Exploring Thomas Jefferson’s Libraries...
Article

Jefferson and Architecture

Architects design buildings. They also make the plans for the buildings. Thomas Jefferson loved architecture. Throughout his life, he drew plans for houses, towns, government buildings, churches and schools. At the time, there were no schools to teach architecture. Jefferson taught himself. He read books about architecture. He studied the drawings of other architects. One…